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Studygroup Philosophy&Psychiatry – Anke Snoek on self-control in addiction

27 October @ 19:00 - 20:00

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Anke Snoek will give a presentation. Below is the abstract to her talk. This session will take place online. Please contact the organizers to receive the Zoom link.   A three layered model to assess loss of self-control in addiction ‘I hate the idea that addicts don’t have control over their behaviour. But why am I taking drugs over and over again when I know it’s not in my favour?’ Anke Snoek (Macquarie University/ VUMC) Current theories viciously battle each other…
Anke Snoek will give a presentation. Below is the abstract to her talk. This session will take place online. Please contact the organizers to receive the Zoom link.  
A three layered model to assess loss of self-control in addiction
‘I hate the idea that addicts don’t have control over their behaviour. But why am I taking drugs over and over again when I know it’s not in my favour?’
Anke Snoek (Macquarie University/ VUMC)
Current theories viciously battle each other on whether and how self-control is lost in addiction. I will argue that loss of self-control in addiction is poorly understood because current theories do not make explicit how they define self-control.
To gain a better understanding on the complex ways in which loss of self-control happens in addiciton, I designed a longitudinal, qualitative study involving 69 mainly opioid and alcohol dependent people. I followed them over a period of 3.5 years, asking them what hampered their self-control and the goals they set for themselves.
Based on these conversations and a wide range of literature from different disciplines, I developed a three layered account to assess how people with addictions lose self-control. I distinguish three hierarchical levels of self-control: 1) intentional self-control, or doing what one intended 2) instrumental self-control, or reaching one's goals, and 3) normative self-control, or living the life one values living and being the person one wants to be.
This three layered model helps to see how the current models can complement each other, rather than compete with each other. This model also shows that there is a range of factors that threatens the self-control of addicted people that the current theories do not account for. For example, how the ‘self’ in self-control is compromised. This model also shows how these different failures interact. Loss of self-control in addiction is not underpinned by failure on just one level, but rather by a set of interacting factors. A better understanding of loss of self-control in addiction also provides new inspiration for recovery. ​

Details

Date:
27 October
Time:
19:00 - 20:00
Event Category:

Anke Snoek will give a presentation. Below is the abstract to her talk.

This session will take place online. Please contact the organizers to receive the Zoom link.

 

A three layered model to assess loss of self-control in addiction
‘I hate the idea that addicts don’t have control over their behaviour. But why am I taking drugs over and over again when I know it’s not in my favour?’
Anke Snoek (Macquarie University/ VUMC)
Current theories viciously battle each other on whether and how self-control is lost in addiction. I will argue that loss of self-control in addiction is poorly understood because current theories do not make explicit how they define self-control.
To gain a better understanding on the complex ways in which loss of self-control happens in addiciton, I designed a longitudinal, qualitative study involving 69 mainly opioid and alcohol dependent people. I followed them over a period of 3.5 years, asking them what hampered their self-control and the goals they set for themselves.
Based on these conversations and a wide range of literature from different disciplines, I developed a three layered account to assess how people with addictions lose self-control. I distinguish three hierarchical levels of self-control: 1) intentional self-control, or doing what one intended 2) instrumental self-control, or reaching one’s goals, and 3) normative self-control, or living the life one values living and being the person one wants to be.

This three layered model helps to see how the current models can complement each other, rather than compete with each other. This model also shows that there is a range of factors that threatens the self-control of addicted people that the current theories do not account for. For example, how the ‘self’ in self-control is compromised. This model also shows how these different failures interact. Loss of self-control in addiction is not underpinned by failure on just one level, but rather by a set of interacting factors. A better understanding of loss of self-control in addiction also provides new inspiration for recovery. ​

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