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The socially distributed self: perspectives from anthropology, cultural psychology and philosophy

17 November @ 17:00 - 19:00

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On Wednesday 17 November the department of Philosophy at the University of Amsterdam will host a public lecture by Prof Dan Zahavi (Copenhagen, Centre for Subjectivity Research) titled: The socially distributed self: perspectives from anthropology, cultural psychology and philosophy. All are welcome. The lecture will take place from 17.00-19.00, at Oudemanhuispoort, C2.17. Abstract: Is selfhood socially constituted and distributed? Although the view has recently been defended by some cognitive scientists, it has for long been popular within anthropology and cultural psychology. Whereas older…
On Wednesday 17 November the department of Philosophy at the University of Amsterdam will host a public lecture by Prof Dan Zahavi (Copenhagen, Centre for Subjectivity Research) titled: The socially distributed self: perspectives from anthropology, cultural psychology and philosophy All are welcome. The lecture will take place from 17.00-19.00, at Oudemanhuispoort, C2.17. Abstract: Is selfhood socially constituted and distributed? Although the view has recently been defended by some cognitive scientists, it has for long been popular within anthropology and cultural psychology. Whereas older texts by, say, Mauss, Geertz, and Markus and Kitayama often contrast a Western conception of a discrete, bounded and individual self with a (supposedly more correct) non-Western sociocentric conception, it has more recently become common to argue that subjectivity is a fluid intersectional construction that is fundamentally relational and conditioned by discursive power structures. I will assess the plausibility of these claims and argue that many of these discussions of self and subjectivity remain too crude. By failing to distinguish different dimension of selfhood, many authors unwittingly end up advocating a form of radical social constructivism that is not only incapable of doing justice to first-person experience, but which also fails to capture the life of a real community. Organisers:  Christian Skirke (Philosophy, UvA) Julian Kiverstein (Psychiatry, Amsterdam UMC)

Details

Date:
17 November
Time:
17:00 - 19:00
Event Category:

On Wednesday 17 November the department of Philosophy at the University of Amsterdam will host a public lecture by Prof Dan Zahavi (Copenhagen, Centre for Subjectivity Research) titled:

The socially distributed self: perspectives from anthropology, cultural psychology and philosophy

All are welcome. The lecture will take place from 17.00-19.00, at Oudemanhuispoort, C2.17.

Abstract:

Is selfhood socially constituted and distributed? Although the view has recently been defended by some cognitive scientists, it has for long been popular within anthropology and cultural psychology. Whereas older texts by, say, Mauss, Geertz, and Markus and Kitayama often contrast a Western conception of a discrete, bounded and individual self with a (supposedly more correct) non-Western sociocentric conception, it has more recently become common to argue that subjectivity is a fluid intersectional construction that is fundamentally relational and conditioned by discursive power structures. I will assess the plausibility of these claims and argue that many of these discussions of self and subjectivity remain too crude. By failing to distinguish different dimension of selfhood, many authors unwittingly end up advocating a form of radical social constructivism that is not only incapable of doing justice to first-person experience, but which also fails to capture the life of a real community.

Organisers: 

Christian Skirke (Philosophy, UvA)

Julian Kiverstein (Psychiatry, Amsterdam UMC)

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The OZSW event calendar lists academic philosophy events organized by/at Dutch universities, and is offered by the OZSW as a service to the research community. Please check the event in question – through their website or organizer – to find out if you could participate and whether registration is required. Obviously we carry no responsibility for non-OZSW events.