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Reading group on: Madison Powers & Ruth Faden (2019). Structural injustice: power, advantage, and human rights. New York: Oxford University Press.

12 January @ 17:00 - 18:30

|Recurring Event (See all)

One event on 26 January 2022 at 17:00

One event on 9 February 2022 at 17:00

One event on 2 March 2022 at 17:00

Description

Read More
Description: In their most recent book published in 2019, Madison Powers and Ruth Faden follow up with their project to develop an approach for social justice in public health and present a wider more general theory of structural injustice. Central to their theory is the relationship between several core dimensions of well-being and fundamental human rights, institutional responsibility and civil activism. In this reading group we would like to provide the space for an in-depth discussion of this work and…
Description: In their most recent book published in 2019, Madison Powers and Ruth Faden follow up with their project to develop an approach for social justice in public health and present a wider more general theory of structural injustice. Central to their theory is the relationship between several core dimensions of well-being and fundamental human rights, institutional responsibility and civil activism. In this reading group we would like to provide the space for an in-depth discussion of this work and its wider implications for bioethics, public health ethics, ethics of technology, and other related fields. At the beginning of each session one of the participants will give a 10-15 min. summary of the chapters to be discussed and will prepare one or two questions to start the discussion. The discussion will then be structured rather loosely according to the group’s needs. Each individual session will take 90min. Schedule:
Session 1: 12.01.22; 17.00 – 18.30 Chapters 1 & 2
Session 2: 26.01.22; 17.00 – 18.30 Chapters 3 & 4
Session 3: 09.02.22; 17.00 – 18.30 Chapters 5 & 6
Session 4: 02.03.22; 17.00 – 18.30 Chapters 7 & 8
Session 5: tbd Discussion with the authors
Contact: If you are interested, please e-mail Leon Rossmaier (l.w.s.rossmaier@utwente.nl) to receive the link to the online meeting and indicate for which session you would like to provide the summary. Additional Readings in response to Powers & Faden: Social Justice. The Moral Foundation of Public Health and Health Policy: Horn, L. (2013). Powers and Faden’s Theory of Social Justice Applied to the Problem of Foetal Alcohol Syndrome in South Africa. Public Health Ethics, 6(1), 3–10. https://doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht004 Inoue, A. (2013). Is Moderate Essentialism Truly Moderate? Public Health Ethics, 6(1), 21–27. https://doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht001 Nielsen, M. E. J., Landes, X., & Andersen, M. M. (2013). Should We Equalize Status in Order to Equalize Health? Public Health Ethics, 6(1), 104–113. https://doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht007 Powers, M., & Faden, R. (2013). Social Practices, Public Health and the Twin Aims of Justice: Responses to Comments. Public Health Ethics, 6(1), 45–49. https://doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht012 Silva, D. S. (2013). Powers and Faden’s Concept of Self-Determination and What It Means to ‘Achieve’ Well-Being in Their Theory of Social Justice. Public Health Ethics, 6(1), 35–44. https://doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht003 Viens, A. M. (2013). Disadvantage, Social Justice and Paternalism. Public Health Ethics, 6(1), 28–34. https://doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht002 Wild, V., & Ganguli Mitra, A. (2013). Meeting the Authors: A Workshop on Social Justice in Public Health with Ruth Faden and Madison Powers. Public Health Ethics, 6(1), 1–2. https://doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht013

Details

Date:
12 January
Time:
17:00 - 18:30

Description:

In their most recent book published in 2019, Madison Powers and Ruth Faden follow up with their project to develop an approach for social justice in public health and present a wider more general theory of structural injustice. Central to their theory is the relationship between several core dimensions of well-being and fundamental human rights, institutional responsibility and civil activism. In this reading group we would like to provide the space for an in-depth discussion of this work and its wider implications for bioethics, public health ethics, ethics of technology, and other related fields.

At the beginning of each session one of the participants will give a 10-15 min. summary of the chapters to be discussed and will prepare one or two questions to start the discussion. The discussion will then be structured rather loosely according to the group’s needs. Each individual session will take 90min.

Schedule:

Session 1: 12.01.22; 17.00 – 18.30 Chapters 1 & 2
Session 2: 26.01.22; 17.00 – 18.30 Chapters 3 & 4
Session 3: 09.02.22; 17.00 – 18.30 Chapters 5 & 6
Session 4: 02.03.22; 17.00 – 18.30 Chapters 7 & 8
Session 5: tbd Discussion with the authors

Contact:

If you are interested, please e-mail Leon Rossmaier (l.w.s.rossmaier@utwente.nl) to receive the link to the online meeting and indicate for which session you would like to provide the summary.

Additional Readings in response to Powers & Faden: Social Justice. The Moral Foundation of Public Health and Health Policy:

Horn, L. (2013). Powers and Faden’s Theory of Social Justice Applied to the Problem of Foetal Alcohol Syndrome in South Africa. Public Health Ethics, 6(1), 3–10. https://doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht004

Inoue, A. (2013). Is Moderate Essentialism Truly Moderate? Public Health Ethics, 6(1), 21–27. https://doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht001

Nielsen, M. E. J., Landes, X., & Andersen, M. M. (2013). Should We Equalize Status in Order to Equalize Health? Public Health Ethics, 6(1), 104–113. https://doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht007

Powers, M., & Faden, R. (2013). Social Practices, Public Health and the Twin Aims of Justice: Responses to Comments. Public Health Ethics, 6(1), 45–49. https://doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht012

Silva, D. S. (2013). Powers and Faden’s Concept of Self-Determination and What It Means to ‘Achieve’ Well-Being in Their Theory of Social Justice. Public Health Ethics, 6(1), 35–44. https://doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht003

Viens, A. M. (2013). Disadvantage, Social Justice and Paternalism. Public Health Ethics, 6(1), 28–34. https://doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht002

Wild, V., & Ganguli Mitra, A. (2013). Meeting the Authors: A Workshop on Social Justice in Public Health with Ruth Faden and Madison Powers. Public Health Ethics, 6(1), 1–2. https://doi.org/10.1093/phe/pht013

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The OZSW event calendar lists academic philosophy events organized by/at Dutch universities, and is offered by the OZSW as a service to the research community. Please check the event in question – through their website or organizer – to find out if you could participate and whether registration is required. Obviously we carry no responsibility for non-OZSW events.