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CPP Colloquium: Andrei Poama

15 March @ 15:15 - 17:00

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Is criminal disenfranchisement compatible with a democratic political order? This article (co-authored with Tom Theuns) considers this question in light of a recently developed view that criminal disenfranchisement is justified because it expresses our commitment to democratic values. We call this view expressive disenfranchisement and refer to the general conception in which it is grounded as democratic expressivism. Contra supporters of expressive disenfranchisement, we argue that democratic expressivism does not offer a sound justification of criminal disenfranchisement. Additionally, we argue…
Is criminal disenfranchisement compatible with a democratic political order? This article (co-authored with Tom Theuns) considers this question in light of a recently developed view that criminal disenfranchisement is justified because it expresses our commitment to democratic values. We call this view expressive disenfranchisement and refer to the general conception in which it is grounded as democratic expressivism. Contra supporters of expressive disenfranchisement, we argue that democratic expressivism does not offer a sound justification of criminal disenfranchisement. Additionally, we argue that, insofar as one really cares about answering serious criminal wrongs via an expression of democratic values, criminal disenfranchisement should be abandoned and replaced with a policy that temporarily coerces the relevant criminals to vote. Democratic expressivists should, in other words, move from supporting the disenfranchisement of serious offenders to endorsing a policy of coerced criminal voting for a finite period of time.

Andrei Poama is assistant professor at the Institute of Public Administration, Faculty of Governance and Global Affairs, Leiden University. His work concentrates on normative theories of punishment, the ethics of public policy, experimental philosophy, and democratic theory. He has published in Philosophy and Criminal Law, European Journal of Political Theory, Public Reason, Raisons Politiques, Philosophy and Public Issues, and the Swiss Political Science Review. He is currently co-editing the Routledge Handbook of Ethics and Public Policy and is co-organizing the Public Ethics Talks series at the FGGA in The Hague.

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Date:
15 March
Time:
15:15 - 17:00
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Event Tags:
Is criminal disenfranchisement compatible with a democratic political order? This article (co-authored with Tom Theuns) considers this question in light of a recently developed view that criminal disenfranchisement is justified because it expresses our commitment to democratic values. We call this view expressive disenfranchisement and refer to the general conception in which it is grounded as democratic expressivism. Contra supporters of expressive disenfranchisement, we argue that democratic expressivism does not offer a sound justification of criminal disenfranchisement. Additionally, we argue that, insofar as one really cares about answering serious criminal wrongs via an expression of democratic values, criminal disenfranchisement should be abandoned and replaced with a policy that temporarily coerces the relevant criminals to vote. Democratic expressivists should, in other words, move from supporting the disenfranchisement of serious offenders to endorsing a policy of coerced criminal voting for a finite period of time.

Andrei Poama is assistant professor at the Institute of Public Administration, Faculty of Governance and Global Affairs, Leiden University. His work concentrates on normative theories of punishment, the ethics of public policy, experimental philosophy, and democratic theory. He has published in Philosophy and Criminal Law, European Journal of Political Theory, Public Reason, Raisons Politiques, Philosophy and Public Issues, and the Swiss Political Science Review. He is currently co-editing the Routledge Handbook of Ethics and Public Policy and is co-organizing the Public Ethics Talks series at the FGGA in The Hague.

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The OZSW event calendar lists academic philosophy events organized by/at Dutch universities, and is offered by the OZSW as a service to the research community. Please check the event in question – through their website or organizer – to find out if you could participate and whether registration is required. Obviously we carry no responsibility for non-OZSW events.