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The OZSW event calendar lists academic philosophy events organized by/at Dutch universities, and is offered by the OZSW as a service to the research community. Please check the event in question – through their website or organizer – to find out if you could participate and whether registration is required. Obviously we carry no responsibility for non-OZSW events.

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(Lecture) The Moral Behavior of Ethics Professors and Models of Moral Cognition

23 May @ 10:30 - 12:00

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Do professional ethicists behave any morally better than do non-ethicists of similar social background? If not, do they at least show greater consistency between their normative attitudes and their outward behavior? Despite a long philosophical tradition associating philosophical reflection with improved moral behavior, these questions have never been empirically examined. I describe four possible models of the relationship between philosophical moral reflection and real-world moral behavior. I then present convergent evidence from studies of about a dozen different types of…
Do professional ethicists behave any morally better than do non-ethicists of similar social background? If not, do they at least show greater consistency between their normative attitudes and their outward behavior? Despite a long philosophical tradition associating philosophical reflection with improved moral behavior, these questions have never been empirically examined. I describe four possible models of the relationship between philosophical moral reflection and real-world moral behavior. I then present convergent evidence from studies of about a dozen different types of moral behavior, including the misappropriation of library books, voting in public elections, courtesy at professional meetings, responsiveness to student emails, charitable donation, organ and blood donation, staying in touch with one's mother, vegetarianism, honesty in responses to surveys, nonpayment of conference registration fees, Nazi party membership in the 1930s, and peer evaluation of overall moral behavior. Where: Spinoza building, Donders room Lecturer: Eric Schwitzgebel (University of California, Riverside)

Do professional ethicists behave any morally better than do non-ethicists of similar social background? If not, do they at least show greater consistency between their normative attitudes and their outward behavior? Despite a long philosophical tradition associating philosophical reflection with improved moral behavior, these questions have never been empirically examined. I describe four possible models of the relationship between philosophical moral reflection and real-world moral behavior. I then present convergent evidence from studies of about a dozen different types of moral behavior, including the misappropriation of library books, voting in public elections, courtesy at professional meetings, responsiveness to student emails, charitable donation, organ and blood donation, staying in touch with one’s mother, vegetarianism, honesty in responses to surveys, nonpayment of conference registration fees, Nazi party membership in the 1930s, and peer evaluation of overall moral behavior.

Where: Spinoza building, Donders room

Lecturer: Eric Schwitzgebel (University of California, Riverside)

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